Kinghoffer "Opera"

Monday September 22 marks the beginning of New York’s Metropolitan Opera season, a season slated to include production of “The Death of Klinghoffer,” the notorious opera romanticizing terrorists who murdered Leon Klinghoffer and caricaturing Jews in bigoted language. As Judea Pearl, father of murdered journalist Daniel Pearl, wrote in a statement to be read at a protest rally against the opera in front of the Met that same day:

I submit to you that there has never been a crime in human history lacking grievance and motivation. The 9/11 lunatics had profound motivations, and the murderers of my son, Daniel Pearl, had very compelling "grievances.”

In the past few weeks we have seen with our own eyes that Hamas and ISIS have grievances, too and, they, too, are lining up for operatic productions with the Met.

Yet civilized society, from the time of our caveman ancestors, has learned to protect itself by codifying right from wrong, separating the holy from the profane, distinguishing that which deserves the sound of orchestras from that which deserves our unconditional revulsion. The Met has smeared this distinction and thus betrayed their contract with society.

Not surprisingly, The New York Times has joined in smearing the distinction between right and wrong, endorsing the Klinghoffer production in an editorial entitled “The Met Opera Stands Firm: ‘The Death of Klinghoffer’ Must Go On” (September 19, 2014)

Unmentioned in the endorsement of the opera are anti-Semitic lyrics, including these sung by one of the terrorist hijackers: "Wherever poor men—Are gathered they can—Find Jews getting fat—You know how to cheat—The simple, exploit—The virgin, pollute—Where you have exploited—Defame those you cheated—And break your own law—With idolatry." Nowhere in the opera are Arabs condemned or ridiculed as a group as Jews are here.

New York Times coverage of Israel continuously reflects the same lack of a moral compass regarding the onslaught of hatred and violence against the Jewish state and neglects the journalistic responsibility to report the full, unvarnished truth about that aggression. Indeed, The Times has a lamentable history of distorting the picture when the victims are Jews, as it did by its own admission in failing to cover the Holocaust fully and accurately.